• What is domestic violence?

    October 15, 2012

    Domestic Violence

    What is Domestic Violence?

    Domestic Violence is a serious and complex issue, and the elements of it should be treated as seriously as any other crime.

    Domestic Violence in it’s simplest of terms is about power and control by one (or more) person over another by threats of or acts of abuse or violence in any of, or all of the following forms: physical, emotional, psychological, sexual, or financial. Despite any definition; in reality this should and does include anyone as the perpetrator and anyone as the victim regardless of gender, sexuality, religion, class, education, culture, race, age, ability, ethnicity, or spirituality when these people are in or have been in an intimate relationship, or within a family relationship.

    It can take many forms, from verbal threats or the occasional slap, to beating, torture, rape and life threatening physical attacks. Victims of domestic violence can suffer terrible injuries from broken bones, scalding, terrible wounds and miscarriage to death.

    [heading style="1"]The emotional scars caused by domestic violence can take years to heal, if at all[/heading]

    It is not easy for the victim or survivor to accept that someone they love and have trusted can behave so aggressively towards them. However, it usually becomes more serious and more frequent the longer it is allowed to continue.Victims and survivors of domestic violence have often been abused over a long period of time before they call Police, though they may not reveal this on Police attendance.In fact, research shows that on average women have been assaulted 33 times before first calling the Police.

    Domestic Violence is a serious crime. It is not acceptable and should be treated as seriously as any other crime.A quarter of all reported violent crimes are domestic violence incidents. There is, however, still a large amount of under reporting of this type of crime to Police.

    Many people having contacted the Police, then state that they do not wish the Police to take any formal proceedings. This can relate to concerns about:

    • Fact that they may lose their partner
    • Threat of Destruction of Pets
    • Financial stability
    • Possessions
    • Possibility/likelihood that they may be subjected to more abuse
    • Home
    • Family
    • Support from extended families
    • Abuse from extended family
    • Children
    • Forced Marriage
    • Fear of being ‘outed’ if lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered

    Because they cannot explain their partner’s behaviour, many victims/survivors assume that they are to blame and victims experiencing domestic violence tend to play down rather than exaggerate the violence.

    If you are, or have been, a victim of domestic violence or you know someone affected, contact Tina Royles to find out how you can take the best course of action to prevent domestic violence or heal the emotional wounds caused by this type of abuse.

    About Tina Royles

    Connet with me: Google+ Tina Royles is the UKs leading expert in domestic violence offering Domestic Violence Counselling, Relationship Counselling and Anger as well as Stress Management Counselling. She is one of the UK’s most qualified and experienced domestic violence experts providing consultancy and advice to those who have suffered domestic violence, are currently in violent relationships or to friends and family of those affected. Tina provides the materials and tools to manage relationship difficulties and domestic violence through awareness and education and is regularly called upon by the national and local press to provide expert comments on high profile cases. Tina Royles

    View all posts by Tina Royles

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